Corporate Video Experts, Expert Articles
How to TRANSFORM your MARKETING using VIDEO

Make the right people take action

Here's how successful businesses use video incredibly effectively

Discover:

  • WHY video is so immensely powerful
  • The 3-Step process to making video work EFFECTIVELY
  • How to generate more profit by increasing sales on your website

Video - how to make it work

How to TRANSFORM your MARKETING using VIDEO

See for yourself, 6 real-world examples familiar to every business

How to use video EFFECTIVELY in:

  • Online Adverts
  • Trade Shows
  • Website Homepages
  • Product Pages
  • Email Marketing
  • Training
Why viral videos are a bad idea

Why viral videos are a bad idea

Top examples of video which went viral, and why it’s usually a bad idea to use this form of marketing


Wouldn’t it be fab to have the whole world talking about your video, with eyes all over your brand or product as it gets shared frantically by all and sundry?

Attempting to create a 'viral video' can seem like a great idea but it has potential to backfire badly in terms of negative perception of your brand or company. It can also cost vastly more financially than other forms of video marketing.

There’s a saying that there’s no such thing as bad publicity which is only half true.

Unpredictable

The elephant in the room with “virality” is that for every viral hit, there are a million misses.

If creating video which went viral was predictable or formulaic, every company would be doing it again and again but the number of huge viral hits is remarkable small.

The creator of the world’s biggest ever viral hit, Psy, withdrew from the music scene completely, knowing only too well he would never be able to repeat the global success of Gangnam Style.

Viral vs Sharable

Video content goes viral because people who watch a video then share it with friends - who share it with their friends. The original concept of a viral video developed long before Facebook became so dominant, when the best way of sharing content was by emailing a link to friends. Funny viral video was new, it was special.

The video of wayward dog Fenton was so special, it was featured in prime-time TV news

Thanks to Facebook and Youtube, video sharing has become so common it’s done tens of thousands of times an hour. Video is shared twice as much as any other content and there’s a lot of content designed to be shareable.

Many companies base their entire business model on creating sharable video content which sits on pages full of adverts. They make money by serving adverts on that page, not by promoting a product within the video.

Any company hoping to create a video which goes viral now competes for attention with a flood of similar content so they have to invest very heavily in social media promotion.

5 Clever Tricks to make them watch

5 Clever Tricks to make them watch

Here are just 5 of the ways a good video gets inside the audience’s head

We live in a world in which video is everywhere for a very good reason – it works. It engages the brain on many different levels and connects with...

Videos which go viral have similar themes

Many (but not all) videos which go viral surprise the viewer in some way, make them laugh, or feature a genuinely emotional moment which is near impossible to replicate or manufacture.

However, including all the right elements does not make a video go viral. If it was predictable, it would be common. It’s far more common for a viral hit to happen completely by accident than for it to happen by design.

'Chewbacca Mom' wanted to share a video of her recent purchase, but it was her unrepeatable sheer genuine joy which made a viral hit

Counter-productive

The hope is that a viral video increases brand awareness which it may indeed do, but it achieves little else in terms of direct sales.

It can also have a dramatically negative result.

There have been numerous claims that the infamous 'Polo, small but tough' video was in fact an advert which was banned, and claims that Volkswagen have denied any involvement with its production.

There have also been claims that Volkswagen commissioned it unofficially, and claims that it was produced for a production company's showreel.

Volkswagen have clearly not requested the video's removal from Youtube however, probably because it actually presents the brand message (Polo, small but tough) very strongly.

Few will argue that brand awareness was achieved, but at the cost of alienating and offending a significant portion of the viewing audience.

Shocking or offending anyone, let alone your potential customers, is obviously a huge business risk.

Bottom line: Viral video is rarely cost-effective

The goal of every video produced by a business is ultimately to generate more revenue.

Given:

The sheer cost of promotion required to try and get a video to go viral;

The intense competition from vast amounts of content designed to be shareable which simply didn’t exist 10 years ago;

The risk of all the cost and effort having negligible effect, or worse - backfiring;

There are more effective ways for a company to allocate its marketing budget. Create video which works and serves the business purpose. If it happens to go viral, fantastic. If not, it is still an effective marketing effort.

How to TRANSFORM your MARKETING using VIDEO

Make the right people take action

Here's how successful businesses use video incredibly effectively

Discover:

  • WHY video is so immensely powerful
  • The 3-Step process to making video work EFFECTIVELY
  • How to generate more profit by increasing sales on your website

What do you think? If you agree with any of the points in this article, share it to your associates, colleages and friends.

If you ‘d like to discuss any of the points with Corporate Video Experts, we’d be only too happy to have an informal chat about how we can help. Call us on 0844 8841939